Magnesium

Recommended Dietary Intakes 
Men – 320 mg
Women – 270 mg
Pregnant women – add 30 mg

This Mineral Is Essential For…

  • production of energy.

  • assists in the assimilation of calcium and potassium.

  • a healthy heart, bones, muscles and blood vessels.

  • production of genetic materials.

Sources…

Dairy products, fish, nuts, meat and seafoods

Comments…

With the help of vitamin B6, magnesium can help to reduce kidney stones, prevent heart disease, bone abnormalities and some types of cancer. May help in alcoholism.

High levels of zinc, using diuretics, having diarrhoea and consuming alcohol will increase the need for magnesium.

Deficiencies Can Cause…

 

  • confusion.

  • fatigue.

  • mental and heart problems.

  • hypertension.

  • asthma.

  • migraine.

  • kidney stones.

Manganese

Recommended Dietary Intakes

 

Adults – 2.0 mg to 5 mg (There is no amount specified in Australia, however these levels are thought to be adequate).

This Mineral Is Essential For.

 

  • proper formation and maintenance of bone, cartilage, and connective tissue.

  • contributing to the synthesis of proteins and genetic material.

  • producing energy from foods.

  • it acts as an antioxidant.

  • normal blood clotting.

  • nervous system.

  • blood sugar regulation

Sources…

Brown rice, nuts, seeds, avocados, seaweeds, wheat germ, beans, whole grains, peas, and strawberries.

Comments…

Deficiencies are rare and toxic levels are rare.

Deficiencies Can Cause…

 

  • atherosclerosis.

  • confusion.

  • convulsions.

  • eye problems.

  • diabetes.

  • osteoporosis.

     

Molybdenum

Recommended Dietary Intakes 
adults – 75 – 250 mcg (however there is no set recommended dietary intake in Australia for this mineral.)

 

This Mineral Is Essential For.

  • nitrogen metabolism

  • iron utilisation

  • carbohydrate metabolism

Sources…

Peas, beans, cereals, pastas, dark greenleafy vegetables, yeast, milk, and organ meats.

Comments…

People generally get enough through diet; deficiency is virtually nonexistent. Toxicity is also rare. Tablets are available but it is not recommended that they are taken as higher doses than normal can cause toxicity. Too much of this mineral can cause weight loss, slow growth, anaemia, diarrhoea, increased levels of uric acid and swollen joints.

Deficiencies Can Cause…

 

  • gum disease

  • cancers

  • impotence in older me

     

Phosphorus

Recommended Dietary Intakes 

Adults – 1000 mg

 This Mineral Is Essential For.

  • transfer of genetic information.

  • for healthy bones and teeth.

  • balance of acid in body

  • energy

  • kidney function.

  • cell growth.

  • contraction of heart muscle.

Sources

Found in most foods – soft drinks, asparagus, bran cereal, rice bran, salmon and other fish, brewer yeast, corn, dairy products, eggs, dried fruit, garlic, nuts, sunflower, pumpkin seeds, meats, poultry, whole grains.

Comments

If too much phosphorus is taken, it can interfere with calcium levels. Deficiencies of phosphorus are rare.

Do not take excess phosphorus if you suffer from kidney or liver disease, heart failure andhigh blood pressure. An adequate balance of phosphorus, magnesium and calcium should be maintained always.

Deficiencies

 

  • irritation of the mucous membranes and inflammation of tissue.

  • destruction of bone.

  • anxiety, fatigue.

  • breathing difficulties.

  • irritability.

  • numbness.

  • trembling

     

Potassium

Recommended Dietary Intakes 
Adults – 1950 – 5460 mg

 

This Vitamin Is Essential For.

Potassium is distributed throughout the body fluids including the blood, lymph and fluid in the cells. also

  • water balance in the body.

  • contraction of muscles.

  • balance of acid and alkali.

  • nerves.

  • energy metabolism.

  • helps prevent stroke.

  • helps maintain proper blood pressure.

  • protein synthesis.

  • carbohydrate metabolism.

Sources…

Lean meats, raw vegetables, and fruits (especially citrus fruits, bananas, avocados and potatoes), dairy products, fish, poultry.

Comments…

There are many things that can affect the levels of potassium in the body. These include –kidney disorders, diarrhoea, the overuse of laxatives, cigarette smoking and caffeine.

Deficiencies Can Cause…

  • nausea or headaches.

  • vomiting and diarrhoea or constipation.

  • dry skin or acne

  • muscle cramps and weakness.

  • poor reflexes.

  • poor concentration and depression or nervousness.

  • heart arrhythmia’s.

Slight potassium deficiency causes no symptoms

 

Sodium

Recommended Dietary Intakes 
Adults – 920 – 2300 mg

This Mineral Is Essential For.

 

  • water balance in the body

  • muscle contraction

  • nerves

  • energy

  • stomach acid production

Sources…

Most of the sodium we receive is from table salt, processed foods, soft drinks, meats, shellfish, condiments, snack foods, food additives, and over-the-counter laxatives.

Comments…

We generally consume far too much sodium. It is more likely that we consume excessive sodium than too little.  Excessive sodium intake can result in high blood pressure,potassium deficiency, liver and kidney disease.

Keeping sodium intake within reasonable limits is critical for long-term health.

Deficiency Can Cause…

 

(Overexertion can cause the deficiency).

  • nausea.

  • dehydration.

  • muscle cramps, and other symptoms of heatstroke.

  • anorexia

  • fatigue.

  • flatulence.

  • headache.

  • low blood pressure

     

Sulphur

This Vitamin Is Essential For.

  • disinfects the blood.

  • resists bacteria.

  • aids in oxidation reactions.

  • aids in bile secretion.

  • protects against toxins.

  • aids the construction of connective tissue.

  • helps bones, teeth, skin, hair and nails.

Sources

Found in protein foods – egg, seafood, beans, milk products, nuts and meats.

Comments

Sulphur is a component of amino acids and is part of every cell, especially hair, nails, muscle, and skin. Neither sulfur deficiency nor toxicity occurs in humans. Inorganic sulfur ingested in large amounts can be harmful

 

Vitamin A (BETA CAROTENE, RETINOL)

(BETA CAROTENE, RETINOL) 
Recommended Dietary Intakes 
Men – 750 mcg
Women – 750 mcg

This vitamin is essential for.

 

  • eyes – vision (especially at night), inflammation.

  • skin – acne, psoriasis, dry or scaly skin, boils and other skin problems.

  • Hair – dandruff, dry or unhealthy hair

  • nails – peeling

  • mucous membranes – nose, throat, respiratory system, and digestive system, vagina, urinary tract and bladder.

  • bones and teeth – proper growth and development.

  • immune system – stimulates wound healing and is useful to ward off colds and flu.

  • youth – slows the aging process.

  • counteracts the toxic effects of smoking.

  • may help prevent some types of cancer.

Beta carotene which is related to vitamin A, acts either as a precursor to vitamin A or as an antioxidant. It is a natural food substance.
Your skin stores beta carotene and your body metabolises it to produce vitamin A as needed. 
It is reported that beta carotene increases your resistance to infection and may help prevent some cancers and vision problems. Beta carotene may also reduce the risk of heart disease.

Sources…

Orange and yellow vegetables and fruits; dark-green leafy vegetables; whole milk, cream, egg yolks and butter; and animal livers, fish liver oils, garlic, and alfalfa.

Comments…

Vitamin A is fat-soluble, and therefore can is stored in the body long-term and supplements are generally not recommended. Too much vitamin A over long periods can cause headaches, vision problems, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dry and flaking skin, or an enlarged liver or spleen. 
No overdose can happen with beta-carotene however, as the body controls the conversion of it from this source.

Deficiencies Can Cause…

 

  • dry hair or skin

  • dry or inflamed eyes

  • poor growth

  • night blindness

  • insomnia

  • boils

  • continuous colds and flu

  • skin disorders

  • loss of appetite and weight.

  • diarrhoea.

Vitamin B Complex

These Vitamins are Essential For.

The vitamin B complex is a combination of essential vitamins. Although each is a distinct nutrient, the B vitamins coexist in many of the same foods and often work together to maintain the health of the metabolism, skin, hair and muscle, immune and nervous system, eyes, liver, digestion system.

They promote cell growth and control stress, anxietyheadachesdepression, andcardiovascular disease.

Sources

Foods rich in B-complex vitamins include liver and other organ meats, fish, poultry, brewer’s yeast, eggs, beans and peas, dark-green leafy vegetables, whole-grain cereals, and dairy products. B vitamins, which are water-soluble, are dispersed throughout the body and must be replenished daily; any excess is excreted in urine.

Deficiencies Can Cause…

  • Oily and scaly skin,

  • upset stomach,

  • headaches,

  • anxiety,

  • moodiness,

  • heart arrhythmia’s.

A deficiency of one B vitamin usually means that intake of all B vitamins is low. It is wise to take a B complex. Most B vitamins are non-toxic unless taken in excessively large amounts.

These Vitamins are Essential For…

The vitamin B complex is a combination of essential vitamins. Although each is a distinct nutrient, the B vitamins coexist in many of the same foods and often work together to maintain the health of the metabolism, skin, hair and muscle, immune and nervous system, eyes, liver, digestion system.

They promote cell growth and control stress, anxietyheadachesdepression, andcardiovascular disease.

Sources

Foods rich in B-complex vitamins include liver and other organ meats, fish, poultry, brewer’s yeast, eggs, beans and peas, dark-green leafy vegetables, whole-grain cereals, and dairy products. B vitamins, which are water-soluble, are dispersed throughout the body and must be replenished daily; any excess is excreted in urine.

Deficiencies Can Cause…

  • Oily and scaly skin,

  • upset stomach,

  • headaches,

  • anxiety,

  • moodiness,

  • heart arrhythmia’s.

A deficiency of one B vitamin usually means that intake of all B vitamins is low. It is wise to take a B complex. Most B vitamins are non-toxic unless taken in excessively large amounts

 

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Thiamine

Recommended Dietary Intakes 
Men – 0.9 – 1.1 mg
Women – 0.7 -0 .8 mg
Children under seven – 0.15 -0 .7 mg
Children seven to eighteen – 0 .8 – 1.2 mg

This Vitamin Is Essential For.

 

  • metabolise carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

  • helps in the conversion of excess glucose into stored fat.

  • circulation.

  • blood formation.

  • increases stamina.

  • brain action, learning capacity and mental health.

  • aids digestion.

  • energy, growth and maintaining normal appetite.

  • muscle tone – particularly in the heart, intestines and stomach.

  • antioxidant.

Athletes, labourers, pregnant women, and other people who burn great amounts of energy may require more than the adult RDA of thiamine.

Sources…

Lean pork, milk, whole grains, brown rice, egg yolks, fish, legumes, liver, poultry, wheat germ, brewers yeast, broccoli, kelp, peas, beans, peanuts, or soybeans.

Comments…

Diets that are high in carbohydrates can decrease the levels of this vitamin as can the use of oral contraceptives, excess alcohol and antibiotics. Aggressive behaviour has been reduced by taking this vitamin. 
Please note the B vitamins should be taken as a complex and not taken individually unless specifically recommended.

Deficiencies Can Cause…

 

  • fatigue and insomnia.

  • loss of appetite.

  • nausea.

  • moodiness and depression.

  • confusion.

  • anaemia.

  • heart arrhythmia’s.

  • Alcohol suppresses thiamine absorption.

  • Beriberi, a disease of the nervous system